Robert Vernet – Tie Dye

1

The hottest look this week from Robert Vernet studios are these sumptuous tie and dye prints. Echoing the recent trends, these are both colourand texture rich, reflective of the true hand craft.

Design and Colour, the agents for CRV artwork, feel that there is currently a backlash from the over load of photographic techniques and transparent layering of flowers. Our clients now want prints that show off artistic hand made skills such as tie and dye, hand drawn and painted, water colourfluidity, brush marks and generally less regular and predictable execution of design.

designandcolour@gmail.com

Instagram – @theprintaffair

23

Robert Vernet

1

Design and Colour are pleased to announce that they have taken on the agency of Creations Robert Vernet in the UK and will be launching their new collection at The London Print Design Fair in Islington.

2

3

The company was founded in 1957 and is based in Lyon, the French city renowned for silk weaving and being the historical centre of textiles in France. With a team of over 20 designers using both the latest digital technology yet still drawing on the importance of hand painted designs, Robert Vernet is recognized as a master of this craft. The company has been awarded the “Living Heritage Company ” label by the Ministry of Commerce for their excellence and expertise.

4

As many of us know in this industry our products have to be valued and it is through attention to detail in both manufacture and styling that this can be achieved. We all compete on a global stage and keeping ahead of colour trends and delivering fresh and exciting patterns are crucial to us all.  Working world wide across the fashion and home furnishing markets the design team are motivated by the diversity of their client’s demands.5

As a print maven it cheers me no end to work with a studio that understands separations and has the wider experience essential to understand production processes. The advantages of digital print are phenomenal yet there are many other print processes and between us we can work to satisfy all our client’s expectations.67

designandcolour@gmail.com

Instagram – @theprintaffair

Frida Khalo Inspires

1

 

 

A collection of prints inspired by the embroideries and weaves of Central America and the warmth of colour often accented with cool blues and greens.

 

 

Frida Kahlo in blue satin blouse, 1939, photograph by Nickolas Muray. © Nickolas Muray Photo Archive

234

567

8910

111213

141516

171819

 

Sarasa Prints explained

123

Printed cotton fabrics were first developed in India during the Indus period 2600—1800 BC, a culture richly skilled in cotton spinning, weaving, dyeing and printing. At this time cotton was completely unknown to Europeans and the Japanese. The Portuguese were probably responsible for developing the trade in printed cotton fabrics during the Age of Discovery in the 15 century.

The name Sarasa derived from the Gujarati word for “excellent” or “beautiful” and was adopted by the traders as the name for these Indian printed cotton fabrics. The trade spread from the middle of the 15th century towards both Europe and the Far East.  These highly patterned cotton chintzes with rich colours were a hit as remember that to many this was a new fibre and cloth that was durable, soft and light.

456

Trailing plants and flowers were a dominant theme in the Indian design which reached a pinnacle during the 17th century Mughal period when many artisans from Persia migrated to India and brought with them not only new techniques but also geometric and floral motifs such as Paisley.

In Japan these fabrics were terribley expensive prized by the Daimyo lords and other members of the highly esteemed and trend setting samurai class.  Rather as with Paisley prints in the UK, during the Edo period (1615–1868) demand fueled the development of local production. Imported cotton was dyed and decorated using stenciling techniques exploiting the Japanese skills in paper and blade making for stenciling and the carving of intricate wooden blocks as their Indian counterparts.

Decorative prints and intricately woven fabrics are still a very important part of Japanese textiles today. It seems fitting that we move from a strong print trend for Chinoiserie to Sarasa florals and geometric designs. These will sit perfectly alongside paisleys and make for a rich print season.

We have raided the library and the new collection from Sublitex to find some exciting Sarasa style prints for you

789

101112

131415

161718

192021

222324

432526

272829

303132

333435

363738

394041

House of Hackney X & Other Stories

1

House of Hackney and & Other Stories are thrilled to introduce a new co-lab collection for SS18. Combining House of Hackney’s decadent prints with & Other Stories’ effortlessly chic silhouettes, the collaboration features ready-to-wear, accessories and shoes that encourage an aesthetic rooted in playfulness and frivolity.

Unsurprisingly, this was the must have collection of the season and it has sold out worldwide since the launch 2 weeks ago but here is a look at the beautifully crafted collection that we are still able to admire from our screens

Screen Shot 2018-06-16 at 22.51.54

Naturally, House of Hackney’s founders, Frieda Gormley and Javvy M Royle, were responsible for picking the prints; mixing up signature floral and zebra stripes in fresh hues of blue, lilac and burnt orange, as well as creating the brand-new ‘tree of life’ foliage design. The duo worked side by side with the & Other Stories team choosing the shapes that worked best and bouncing around various sources of inspiration such as Kate Bush and London street fashion.

2

Founders of House of Hackney, Frieda Gormley and Javvy M Royle

Screen Shot 2018-06-16 at 22.52.22

“We love & Other Stories’ silhouettes, print treatments and how meaningful the brand’s social messaging feels. The collection that we created together plays on a heightened version of the colours and shapes found in nature. We were inspired by British psychedelia, vibrant fabrics from our local Ridley Road Market, and the bohemian mood of the Bloomsbury Group,” says Frieda Gormley.

Screen Shot 2018-06-16 at 22.52.37

Feminine and bohemian, the collection is full of laidback dresses and skirts, wide-leg trousers and voluminous blouses as well as bags, shoes and scarves, primarily made in sustainable materials such as TENCEL® and organic cotton. The collection captures a free spirited mood highlighted by the fluid silhouettes that reflect the notion that every woman should enjoy having fun with their wardrobes.

Screen Shot 2018-06-16 at 22.52.48

“House of Hackney transcends trends and plays in a quirky world of their own. We had a lot of fun co-creating a collection that invites women to play more and mix and match fearlessly without any restrictions,” says Anna Nyrén, Head of Colabs, & Other Stories.

3

 

 

 

 

Royle and Gormley, at their east London home, wearing designs from their & Other Stories collection.

 

 

 

Here is a look at some of the gorgeous items in the collection:

456

With thanks to the House of Hackney Press team

All images from stories.com and houseofhackney.com

 

Paisleys

1

Paisleys

A key look coming through are these wonderful designs that offer infinite colour possiblilities and can swing from the bright outrageous to the softest most feminine look.

Originating in Persia and modern day Afganistan these patterns date back over 2000 years and were liberally applied to buildings, pots, textiles and all nature of things. During the 1600s luxurious fabrics were woven for wealthy gentlemen using threads of precious metals and jewels. As always the luxury trend trickled down to simpler renditions and the market was expanded by the Moghul empire.

During the 1600s the East India Company imported shawls from Kashmir to the great delight of the wealthy British gentry. Thanks to Napoleon the importation was distrupted by the wars at the end of the eighteenth entry. Simpler mass market versions were then produced with the help of the industrial revolution and weaving mechaniztion particularly in the silk textile town of Paisely in Scotland. The British penchant for this persian design was therefore satisfied and it is interesting to note that in other European countries this is  called a Persian or Cashmire design being true to its origin.

Here are a few of the superb Paisleys that Sublitex have, coloured from soft elegance, to brights to deep luxurious richness and finally the terribley commercial monotone.

234

567

8910

111213

141516

171819

202122

232425

262728